Ian Ruhter – American Dream

[VimeeeeeeeeO] <— 214,000

The American Dream video is based on the fear of success, this thought is extremely powerful, fear has the ability to cripple us from pursuing our dreams. The moment I embraced my dreams it was as if the universe had drawn people to help us and share their stories. Our goal is to tell the stories of the people who live in America.

“If that one little idea is in your head that’s saying I can’t do it … that’s disability right there.”
– Oscar Ricardo Loreto Jr. – @oskervoid

“It’s just like the old way of doing things … just barter and trade.”
— Ian Ruhter – @ian_ruhter

The Important Places

Yesterday Teton Gravity Research posted this video on FB, and what drew me in to watch  the ten minute film was the description they posted along with it “This is one of the most powerful short films that I have watched in a long time.”

The story is about a son who is seeing his aging father begin to withdraw slowly – due to age – from the things that once made him so passionate about life.

A poem that his father wrote for him as a baby has stuck with him since childhood, and so the son challenges his aging father to reconnect with what inspired him in his younger years, and to go back to what he knows is an important place for his father.

They embark on a 28 day boating trip down the Grand Canyon together, and the words that this father had written to his son begin to take on a new significance and understanding for the son.

I can’t stop watching, and sharing this video. I even made Greg and our friend Drew come upstairs right after I finished watching it so they could watch it with me on the Apple TV. It’s an emotional film, and for me, has extra significance because just three months ago, I was embarking on my own 21 day trip down the Grand Canyon with some close friends, and I think this captures some of the magic that is unexplainable, but always happens when you’re on extended adventures that push your normal comfort zone.

I think this film challenges us to all think, what are your important places? Where would you go back to, if you could? What have you maybe distanced yourself from, that in the past has brought you joy?

The poem and the film speak for themselves. The best way to describe them is simple – powerful.

The Important Places

Child of mine, come as you go
In youth you will learn, these secret places
The cave behind the waterfall
The arms of the oak that hold you high
The stars so near on a desert ledge
The important places
And as with age, you choose your own way
Among the many faces of a busy world
May you always remember the path that leads back
Back to the important places

-Dad, for Forest, 1986

-Cooley

I Want To Say


[YouTubeUlar] <— 5,145 I'm no expert by any means... but I do impose a question. When viewing the above video about technology being the solution for autism — Has anybody thought about technology being the creator of autism? Autism birth rates: 1970 - 1 in 10,000 1995 - 1 in 1,000 2012 - 1 in 88 ?

HYDLE – TSOIGDH

In the history of HYDLE.com… this ridiculous “TSOIGDH” entry marks my 999th public blog post since May of 2009 – When I started this crazy world of blogging ideas, thoughts and Genius vs. Not Genius intermanents and social media successes or failures.

So for the sake of getting google credit for it…

“TSOIGDH” = TURNING SHIT ON IT’S GOD DAMN HEAD

Turning shit on it’s god damn head is going to be my 1 single inspiration for the next 999 blogpost entries. I can’t wait to open up my connection layer for all my loyal readers… so I can start finding out who you actually are.

Cheers to 999!

TSOIGDH

John Lynch – ABROAD

[Vimeeeeeo]

Todays “sit down and watch” video is brought to you buy a traveling friend Katie Hilborn. While Katie is traveling and rocking out Phuket she is also sharing solid work from her friends.

Discussing the message of his new film, John Lynch states,

“It’s about how meeting fellow travelers can open up your world. I hope this movie encourages others to get off the tourist trail, throw away their itineraries, and get involved with something out of their comfort zone; stepping in to make a difference is much more rewarding than just being an observant tourist.”

On a personal level, he found satisfaction in the fact that he “did not just find a story to tell, but lived a story worth telling.”

[Press Release]
[Lynch Film]