Alan Watts – Wake Up


[YouTubeUlar] <— 521,871 Need a quote to inspire the weak necessities of real work, real time and real money? Pick one of these 50 Quotes from Alan Watts and get busy. Good luck freeing your mind.

Need more inspiration?
[What Do You Desire?]

Still need more?
[What Do You Desire – FULL]
[What Do You Desire – RAW Audio Only]

Alan_WattsPick one. Get inspired… and wake up.

Zen Buddhist Alan Watts passed away, or transformed life in November, 1973 at the age of 58. He was an imaginative creature and I feel as if I could learn a lot from him and his writing.
[Alan Watts Wikipedia]

Here is another?
[Alan Watts on Hermits and Outcasts]

Life Is Full

When things in your life seem almost too much to handle, when 24 hours in a day are not enough, remember the mayonnaise jar and the 2 beers.

A professor stood before his philosophy class and had some items in front of him. When the class began, he wordlessly picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with golf balls. He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was.

The professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar. He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles rolled into the open areas between the golf balls. He then asked the students again if the jar was full. They agreed it was.

The professor next picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up everything else. He asked once more if the jar was full.. The students responded with a unanimous ‘yes.’

The professor then produced two Beers from under the table and poured the entire contents into the jar effectively filling the empty space between the sand. The students laughed…

‘Now,’ said the professor as the laughter subsided, ‘I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life. The golf balls are the important things — your family, your children, your health, your friends and your favorite passions — and if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full. The pebbles are the other things that matter like your job, your house and your car… The sand is everything else — the small stuff.

‘If you put the sand into the jar first,’ he continued, ‘there is no room for the pebbles or the golf balls. The same goes for life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness.

Spend time with your children. Spend time with your parents. Visit with grandparents. Take your spouse out to dinner. Play another 18. There will always be time to clean the house and mow the lawn.

Take care of the golf balls first — the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

One of the students raised her hand and inquired what the Beer represented. The professor smiled and said, ‘I’m glad you asked.’ The Beer just shows you that no matter how full your life may seem, there’s always room for a couple of Beers with a friend.

Hugh MacLeod – #YayHappy

Hydle to Hugh MacLeod - #YayHappy

Make It Happen

When I was younger, I thought love just kinda happened. You met a girl/boy, you liked him/her, he/she liked you, then suddenly BAM!!!! Fireworks and happy ever after.

Luckily (as it turns out), it doesn’t work that way. It takes effort and deliberation. You gotta be proactive. “Random” might get you laid on occasion, but that’s about it.

That being said, it’s still a very happy cartoon… #YayHappy.

Seth Godin – What are you leaving behind?

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I love watching contrails, those streams of white frozen exhaust that jets leave behind. It's a temporary track in the sand, and then the sun melts them and they're gone.

Go to Montana and you might see the tracks dinosaurs left a bazillion years ago. Same sort of travel, very different half-life of their passage.

All day long you're emailing or tweeting or liking or meeting… and every once in a while, something tangible is produced. But is there a mark of your passage? Fifty years later, we might hear a demo tape or an outtake of something a musician scratched together while making an album. Often, though, there's no trace.

I'm fascinated by blogs like this one, which are basically public notes and coffee breaks by a brilliant designer in between her 'real' work. Unlike tweets, which vanish, Tina's posts are here for a long time and much easier to share and bookmark. Her trail becomes useful not just to her, but to everyone who is interested.

What would happen if you took ten minutes of coffeebreak downtime every day and produced an online artifact instead? What if your collected thoughts about your industry became an ebook or a series of useful instructions or pages or videos?

What if we all did that?

Josh Dueck – On Ellen


[YouTubeUlar] <— 87,957 Josh Duek continues his trek of inspiration through the ski industry. It is good to follow up with him through Ellen above and a nice Freeskier interview.

“The greater the adversity one faces in life; the greater the opportunity is to grow and learn. When something bad happens there is a build up of energy and how you direct that energy is a choice you make.”

[Josh Dueck on Hydle]

Hugh MacLeod – I Cannot

This is really about leadership. Leaders understand, often innately, what it takes to inspire action.

Inspired action is a much different animal than top down directed action.

Inspired people will walk through fire to achieve their goal. Directed people are in it for the paycheck.

It was the difference between the Roman legions and mercenary adversaries.

It is why so many businesses these days are focussed on finding their true purpose, and why we spend a lot of our time helping companies communicate that purpose.

Purpose allows for inspired action with amazing results.

Seth Godin – You are Welcome

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“What would you have me do instead?”

To the critic who decries a project as a worthless folly, something that didn’t work out, something that challenged the status quo and failed, the artist might ask,

“Is it better to do nothing?”

To the critic who hasn’t shipped, who hasn’t created his art, anything less than better-than-what-I -have-now appears to be a waste. To this critic, progress should only occur in leaps, in which a fully functioning, perfected new device/book/project/process/system appears and instantly and perfectly replaces the current model.

We don’t need your sharp wit or enmity, please. Our culture needs your support instead.

Each step by any (and every) one who ships moves us. It might show us what won’t work, it might advance the state of the art or it might merely encourage others to give it a try as well.

To those who feel that they have no choice but to create, thank you.