The Perlorian Brothers – Social Farter


I’ve recently had this idea to change the word “work” to “fuck”. It’s a play on words to call out the people in this world that are always just too busy to do anything worthwhile or fun… the people that always have excuses to not go skiing, or to not grab a drink or to NOT hang out. No no no no no. They are wrapped into their own world of being too busy… “working” all the time.

In your reply to these non-existent people in our lives… swap “work” to “fuck” and see how long it takes them to understand what you are doing.

“Ohhh, I’m sorry you fuck from 9 to 5.”
“You have to fuck on the weekends!?”
“You fuck all the time.”
“Well, when your done fucking – maybe we can hang out.”

The way I envision the advertisement for our public service campaign about getting people out of the office in their mind — would be a mix between Budlight – Swear Jar and the above beautiful ad I found today from The Perlorian Brothers [Vimeo], [Facebook – 2321].

The Social Farter is a genius PSA by the Canadian Ministry of Health’s Quit the Denial campaign.

[Quit the Denial – Social Farting] <— 346 [Quit the Denial – Social Nibbler] <— 10 views [Quit the Denial – Social Earwax Picker] <— 15 views I found these while researching old advertising methods and came across Calvin Cline’s 1980 campaign with Brooke Shields when she was 15 years old.

Facebook Pillars – Graph Search

[YouTubeUlar] <— 321 Facebook added a new pillar to hold itself up today.

Facebook Pillars:

  1. News Feed
  2. Timeline
  3. Graph Search

It will be interesting to see how strong the tripod 3 pillar effect will be at sustaining future growth of this world changing company whose mission is to “make the world more open and connected”.

[TheVerge – Read Full]

Seth Godin – People Strategy

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Hard to imagine a consultant or investor asking the CMO, “so, what’s your telephone strategy?”

We don’t have a telephone strategy. The telephone is a tool, a simple medium, and it’s only purpose is to connect us to interested human beings.

And then the internet comes along and it’s mysterious and suddenly we need an email strategy and a social media strategy and a web strategy and a mobile strategy.

No, we don’t.

It’s still people. We still have one and only one thing that matters, and it’s people.

All of these media are conduits, they are tools that human beings use to waste time or communicate or calculate or engage or learn. Behind each of the tools is a person. Do you have a story to tell that person? An engagement or a benefit to offer them?

Figure out the people part and the technology gets a whole lot simpler.

Seth Godin – The Economics of Christmas Lights

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Why bother buying them, putting them up, electrifying them and then taking them down again?

After all, the economist wonders, what’s in it for you?

The very same non-economic contribution is going on online, every single day. More and more of the content we consume was made by our peers, for free. My take:

People like the way it feels to live in a community filled with decorated houses. They enjoy the drive or the walk through town, seeing the lights, and they want to be part of it, want to contribute and want to be noticed too.

Peace of mind and self-satisfaction are incredibly valuable to us, and we happily pay for them, sometimes contributing to a community in order to get them.

The internet is giving more and more people a highly-leveraged, inexpensive way to share and contribute. It doesn’t cost money, it just takes guts, time and kindness.

No wonder most people don’t insist on getting paid for their tweets, posts and comments.

Two asides: First, it’s interesting to note that no one (zero) gets paid to put up Christmas lights, but some towns are awash in them.

and second, I think there’s a parallel to the broken windows theory here. Broken Windows asserts that in cities with small acts of vandalism and unrepaired facades, crime goes up. The Christmas Light corollary might be that in towns (or online communities) where there’s a higher rate of profit-free community contribution, happiness and productivity go up as well.